Lindsay Warrenburg

Lindsay Warrenburg is a Ph.D. candidate studying Music Theory, Cognition, and Perception. She successfully defended her dissertation, entitled Subtle Semblances of Sorrow: Exploring Music, Emotional Theory, and Methodology, in July 2019. Her dissertation explores how and why people perceive and experience emotions from music listening, with an emphasis on sad music. The dissertation incorporates a diverse number of methodologies, including literature reviews, a new model of emotion, a database she created of over 22,000 musical stimuli, various behavioral studies, and multiple theoretical perspectives.

Lindsay received a M.A. in Music (Theory, Cognition, and Perception) from OSU in 2016 and a B.A. in Music (and pre-med) from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013.

Some of Lindsay’s past and current projects have included research on how acetaminophen can reduce emotional responses to music, creation of a corpus of Previously-Used Musical Stimuli (PUMS), examining the difference between melancholic and grief-like music, identifying qualia evoked by listening to melodic intervals, how physical fitness and stress tolerance affect musical preferences, and an examination of how psychological research relates to musical development in children. Her Master’s thesis utilized both music theoretic and psychological (perception) methods to examine structural features in music themes. In addition to her empirical music research, she has been trained in conducting psychophysical and neuroimaging work in the fields of neuroscience and psychology. While at OSU, she has taken many classes in the psychology and cognitive science departments. She has a strong interest and background in statistics and behavioral research methods.

Lindsay founded and co-chairs (with Lindsey Reymore) the Music & Science Colloquium and Teaching Series (MASCATS), which has included lectures and methodology seminars from speakers across the U.S. and Canada to promote interdisciplinary research. They are currently planning a week-long symposium/workshop hybrid called Future Directions of Music Cognition, to be held at OSU in May 2020.

For her MASCATS work and dissertation research, Lindsay has been awarded grants from the Ohio State Energy Partners, the Center for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, and the Alumni Grants for Graduate Research Scholarship. Other awards include the Graduate Achievement Award in Music Theory, the Aubrey Hickman Award from the Society for Education, Music, and Psychology Research (SEMPRE), the Helmholtz Award for Music Psychology, and a Distinguished University Fellowship for Graduate Studies.

Please email Lindsay with any questions!

Personal Website: lindsaywarrenburg.com

Selected Publications:

Warrenburg, L. A. (in press). Choosing the right tune: A review of music stimuli used in emotion research. Music Perception. See the paper here

Warrenburg, L. A. (in press). Comparing musical and psychological emotion theories. Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain. See the paper here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Huron, D. (2019). Tests of contrasting expressive content between first and second musical themes. Journal of New Music Research, 48(1), 21-35. See the paper here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Huron, D. (2019). Fitness and musical taste: Do physically fit listeners prefer more stressful music? Empirical Musicology Review, 13(1-2), 21-38. See the paper here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Way, B. (2018). Acetaminophen blunts emotional responses to music. In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference for Music Perception and Cognition (pp. 483-488). Montréal, Canada. See the paper here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Huron, D. (2016). Perception of structural features in first and second musical themes. In Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Music Perception and Cognition (pp. 132-137). San Francisco, CA. See the paper here

Selected Presentations/Posters:

Warrenburg, L. A. (2019). Melancholy versus grief: Has research on musical ‘sadness’ conflated two different affective states? Paper presented at the Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research Graduate Conference, Cambridge, UK. See the presentation here

Warrenburg, L. A. (2019). The effect of acetaminophen on music, speech, and natural sounds. Paper presented at the biannual national conference of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, New York, NY. See the presentation here

Warrenburg, L. A. (2019). Signifiers of transcendence in moments of Durchbruch in Mahler symphonies 1 and 2. Paper presented at the annual conference of Music Theory Society of New York State, Albany, NY. See the presentation here

Warrenburg, L. A., Reymore, L. E., & Shanahan, D. (2019). Multimodal emotion associations in music and dance. Paper presented at the biannual national conference of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, New York, NY. See the presentation here

Warrenburg, L. A. The importance of utilizing emotional granularity in music and emotion research. Society for Music Perception and Cognition, New York, NY, August 2019. Poster. See the poster here

Warrenburg, L. A. & Léveillé Gauvin, H. Assembling a database of validated audio stimuli: Evaluating valence in musical and non-music sounds. Music Informatics Interest Group of the Society for Music Theory Annual conference, Arlington, VA, November, 2017. Poster. See the poster here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Huron, D. (2016). Perception of structural features in first and second musical themes. Paper presented at the biannual conference of the International Conference for Music Perception and Cognition, San Francisco, CA. See the presentation here

Warrenburg, L. A. (2016). Contrasting expressive content in musical themes. Paper presented at the Edward F. Hayes Graduate Research Forum, Columbus, OH. See the thesis on which the presentation was based here

Warrenburg, L. A., Huron, D., & Libby, L. The effect of music listening on prosocial behavior. Center for Cognitive Brain Sciences Fall Retreat, Sterling, OH, August 2016. Poster. See the poster here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Huron, D. Do melodic intervals evoke distinctive qualia? International Conference for Music Perception and Cognition, San Francisco, CA, July 2016. Poster. See the poster here

Warrenburg, L. A., & Huron, D. (2015). Physical fitness and musical taste: Do physically fit listeners prefer more stressful music? Paper presented at the biannual national conference of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, Nashville, TN. See the presentation here